‘DAD IS DEAD’

‘DAD IS DEAD’ – By Nwachukwu Obinna

From my window, I watched as Anne walked out through the back gate tagging along a travelling bag with a suspicious gait.

Six months ago Dad had sent Mum packing out of the house. He had caught mum on the bed naked with Uncle Benjamin. Mum’s departure gave Anne more leverage. She began trooping in and out of Dad’s room as she pleased. No longer afraid of Mum’s intrusion.

To Anne’s bewilderment, two weeks ago Dad had invited a woman over for dinner. Her name was Sarah. Dad had introduced her as his new wife-to-be. Anne’s distraught could be seen from where she sat eating that night. I overheard her few minutes after dinner was over, yelling at Dad inside the kitchen. That was when I knew, things would never be the same again with Dad and our maid Anne.

Mum and Dad quarreled a lot. Uncle Benjamin had told me that Dad was unhappy because Mum had given birth to a half-wit for a son. Uncle Benjamin had called it Down syndrome. ‘It was better than having an imbecile or a thug for a son’ he had said. I could still walk straight with my shoulders high not minding how short and broad my limbs were. And I could still read and write even though the kids in my school laughed at my handwriting and the way I pronounced words.

Storried Dad is Dead

Ever since Mum’s departure, the house had become increasingly hostile and annoyingly quiet. Not that I cared much about Dad’s clammed up attitude but the house became dead and lonely without Mum. I felt abandoned. Mum’s voice, whenever she sang. And the stories she told me before I went to sleep every night became a haunted memory. Fridays became a day for me as Christmas day would be for every other child. I got to spend the weekends with Mum. I went over to her apartment on Fridays and came back home on Sundays.

I walked down the stairs some minutes after Anne left. It was a quarter past the seven o’clock hour of the morning. The dining table was empty. There was no food and there was no Dad. It was unusual. Dad never missed breakfast. He said it was the most important meal of the day and should be done at the proper time. He chose 7 o’clock as the breakfast time because he often leaves for work on or before thirty minutes past.

I checked around the house for Dad. I walked down the kitchen and to the balcony but he wasn’t in any of those places. I went outside and his car was there. I became scared because even inside his room Dad was not there still. I saw Anne leave the house with her bag this morning. And now Dad was nowhere to be found. Then I remembered, last night I saw Dad sneaked into Anne’s room half naked. That was some minutes after dinner was over and Dad thought I was on my bed fast asleep. I went over to Anne’s room and opened the door. Completely naked on Anne’s bed was Dad.

“Dad…?” I muttered after I overcame my sudden stupefaction and regained speech after being dumbstruck for some minutes. Dad didn’t move. “Dad! Dad!” I shouted as I tapped him repeatedly. Still, there was no response. Dad just laid there still and lifeless. With Anne gone and Mum living far away, there was nothing I could do. So I went back to my room and stayed.

Then it occurred to me. ‘Dad is dead. Anne is gone.’ I looked for the tiny black bottle Mum had given me last week. “I had emptied all of its contents in Dad’s tea last night. Mum would be very proud of me.” I thought to myself smiling as I stared at the empty container I was holding.

 

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‘DAD IS DEAD’

By Nwachukwu Obinna

From my window, I watched as Anne walked out through the back gate tagging along a travelling bag with a suspicious gait.

Six months ago Dad had sent Mum packing out of the house. He had caught mum on the bed naked with Uncle Benjamin. Mum’s departure gave Anne more leverage. She began trooping in and out of Dad’s room as she pleased. No longer afraid of Mum’s intrusion.

To Anne’s bewilderment, two weeks ago Dad had invited a woman over for dinner. Her name was Sarah. Dad had introduced her as his new wife-to-be. Anne’s distraught could be seen from where she sat eating that night. I

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